July 11, 2022

Juliana Owen | On Building Your Career in the Australian Job Market

Juliana Owen | On Building Your Career in the Australian Job Market

Juliana Owen was voted Top 10 Career Coaches to be watched in 2021 by the Australian Business Journal. Originally from Brazil, she has over 2 decades of global experience working across strategy, people and culture, and recruitment.

She’s the founder of her brand New Mind Consulting.

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Content
00:00 Juliana Owen
00:19 Intro
01:04 Juliana's Journey from Brazil to Australia
04:55 Going out on her own
08:14 What does a day in her life look like?
10:36 What Juliana helps people with
14:01 Differences in Job applications in Australia
19:00 Common Problems with Professional Applications
23:49 Are cover letters less common?
27:40 Undervalues parts of the application process
32:04 Similar traits in successful job applicants
38:06 Juliana's Advice for Graduates
41:00 Where to find Juliana
41:45 Outro

Transcript
Juliana:

And people go, oh, but they are, you're not well prepared. And then you create an illusion and, and, uh, you know, if you do not look for development in those areas, you're just gonna become a victim of the system, right.

James:

Today's guest was voted top 10 career coaches to be watched in 2021 by the Australian business journal. Originally from Brazil, she has over two decades of global experience working across strategy people and culture and recruitment. She's the founder of her brand new mind consulting. Please. Welcome to the show. Juliana Owen. welcome to the show. Yeah. Yeah, that's it. very nice. Well, I'd love to start the show today, Juliana, and talk about your, your journey and kind of the start of your career, cuz you, you did quite a big thing, which is moving from, uh, somewhere that doesn't speak English to somewhere that does, uh, and then trying to work out everything that goes along with that. Trying to find a job and, and all the, yeah, everything like that. I'd love to ask you, you know, how, what was that experience like and kind of what led you to come to Australia and, and start your career here?

Juliana:

Yeah. So I've started in, uh, recruitment and talent acquisition back in Brazil. I did, um, degree in psych. Which was, I guess my first, um, step into this, uh, world of person and professional development. Um, very, it's very fascinating when you start understanding and learning, how does, you know, this software here works and how you can use this for your own benefit in terms of putting yourself in different environments? So back in Brazil, I've worked for global businesses. Um, And, uh, I guess the highlight of my career, there was the bank, which was the largest outsourcing Latin America. Um, I also worked for a couple for the American business there, uh, where I had the opportunity to set up, um, you know, the professional side of the, the, the business with, um, Very senior people. Um, and that's when I start learning a lot about recruitment strategies career, uh, and then the personal side comes with that because you're dealing with people. Uh, so when you're dealing with people, everyone pretty much wants to be, uh, majority of us wants to be successful in life in career. So then I start combining all. You know, part of the psychology also with the part of the business, um, combined together. So I finished my degree in 2008, um, and, um, I had a very good opportunity in Brazil to step up on my career was working for an American business, but I needed to improve my communication skills. So I decided to come to Australia. Do a business for English course get my communication skills up to speed. And, uh, I did not have any plans to stay here for good. Um, but I fell in love with Sydney immediately. Um, how you're not going to, right for me is the most beautiful place in the entire planet. I love it here so much. Um, so fell in love with Sydney. And then start kind of developing my communication skills and, uh, obviously looking for a job that would challenge me. Right? So here in Australia, what I've been doing across recruitment, uh, and also consulting and talent acquisitions. So I've worked for a large. Recruitment agencies. And I have also worked for consulting businesses. Um, and, um, my last two roles before I set up a new mind consulting, uh, was pretty much talent acquisition and head of talent, where I had to add my experience on the life side, on the personal self development side, and also, uh, the professional side, um, along this journey here in Australia for the past 13 years. I have done a lot of different courses. So I've Studi in neuroscience, relationship counseling, uh, cognitive behavioral therapy, um, uh, P and L as well. Um, neurolinguistic programming. Um, and this all obviously helped me to. Combine these skills give the best to clients, um, that I was working the corporate world. Um, and this was the spark to pretty much start thinking about your mind consulting, uh, which was a project that I had in mind for a long time. Um, and, um, you know, people naturally used to come to me, um, backing the days in, in Brazil and also here in Australia. Um, Asking for, you know, uh, uh, coaching, mentoring across these two main areas, um, life and career, they are much more interlinked than what we think. Um, so usually if you're looking for your success in, at work, you will pretty much develop that much, uh, faster if you are, you know, well developed or at least you have a solid kind of base on your personal

James:

Yeah, no. Cool. That's really cool. And I'd love to ask as well. So the going from you're working in recruitment, different sorts of roles in, in big companies. And, and then you went to start your own thing. What was the. Was there a particular moment there that you were like, oh, yep. I'm gonna do this now. Like, and go out on my own or

Juliana:

Yeah.

James:

the story behind that?

Juliana:

Yeah. So this, um, basically when the pandemic hit, I know there was a big shock for everyone around the world, right? Cuz people were being secure about their jobs. What's gonna happen with the market situation, a lot of different, uh, uh, aspects of life itself. Uh, but I had this project turned on the back of my mind and I was. Working, you know, towards the completion of this project. So when the pandemic hit, I was like, yes, that's exactly the opportunity I was waiting for. Uh, because I wanted to go and service different people around the world. Um, because there are a lot of different nationalities that wanna come to Australia and be successful in this country. I do think Australia gives a lot of opportunities for everyone. Um, So working online would be the best, uh, way to go. So when the pandemic hit, I was like, perfect. So I'm gonna set up an online platform. I can connect with people around the world. People, they are looking to come to Australia. People, they are already here, but because we lock down, we cannot get out of our houses. Um, and, uh, I guess there was the perfect timing really, because I've been, I've been really busy since then, which is

James:

Yeah. no, definitely. That's interesting. Yeah. That you would, uh, kind of frame the, uh, pandemic as an opportunity. I think that's really cool. Um, that you think of it like that?

Juliana:

Oh, look, James. I, I see everything that happens in life. This is actually one of the things that I work a lot with for my clients. Right. We all naturally when we see a barrier or a challenge that we need to overcome is straight away, because the way we've been, you know, set up in society straight away, we think, oh, that's gonna be a problem. Oh, that's negative. We always go towards that side. My job is to, um, help people to change their mindset and make that become excited for them. So if you look at the challenges you're gonna be facing as a platform for your success, not as a problem, It's much easier for you to get motivated for you to get your determination for you to get into that without feeling pain. So you, you actually on the challenge and when you are on the challenge, your brain feels curious about what's the final outcome. Cause I'm on the challenge, but if you're in the problem, you just go, wow, I'm in the problem. What am I gonna do here? Um, so yeah, I saw the pandemic as a fantastic opportunity for, for my

James:

Yeah. No, definitely. That's cool. I think that, yeah, it's, it's always, uh, exciting when people can, yeah. I, I feel like many people would look at yeah. The pandemic or something like that and be like, oh yeah, like you said, you know, this sucks. Like it's like all the negatives of it. So I think that's really cool that yeah, you can look at something like that and. Obviously there are negatives, but you know, we can look at the positives and choose to take it as something positive. I think that's really powerful. Um, one thing I wanna ask too is so someone like yourself as, as a coach and, and things like that, I'm interested to know kind of what you actually do and kind of what a day in your life looks like. Um, cuz I feel like sometimes being a coach it's kind of, or, or, you know, helping people with careers or whatever it might be. Um, it's hard to kind of have some tangible, you know, okay. What does that actually involve? So perhaps, I don't know, obviously we don't wanna share like too much about what exactly you do, but I'd love if you could kind of give a bit of a glimpse about like perhaps what a day in Juliana's life, uh, looks like

Juliana:

Okay. look, I would say busy really, really busy. Um, so usually my day starts around, uh, six. I do my exercise in the morning. I actually do what I preach to my clients. Right. Um, so it is, I think is all about leading by example as well. And, uh, once you go through the process, you can understand what your client will be facing terms of, uh, you know, difficulty to over. One or the aspect of the, the, the process of self development. Um, so usually, um, I get up very early, do my exercise, do my meditation, have my breakfast, um, get myself ready for my first session. Usually my first session starts at seven in the morning. Uh, I also work around people's availability. Um, so. That's another advantage about working online, uh, and working from home because I have clients, for example, in London, um, when they waking up at nine in the morning here in Australia, 6:00 PM. Uh, but I also have clients that finish work at six 30 and then that session will start at 7:30 PM. So my day starts at seven, finished around nine, really busy diary management is something that is very challenging on the database because people change. You know, priorities meetings, kids whatever's going on in their life and I'll work around, um, around this client. But usually I like to get myself ready so I can give the best I have to my clients and they can make the most of the sessions. Um, the sessions usually go from, uh, 60 to 90 minutes. Um, depends what we are working on and which program the, the, the client is actually interested. What,

James:

no. Cool. It's uh, it's interesting to hear what it's like. Um, Definitely cause yeah, I, yeah, like I said, I think coaching, it's hard to understand like, okay, what is What do you actually do? Yeah,

Juliana:

what do they do,

James:

yeah, yeah. Well, yeah. I I'd love to kind of get into that and kind of perhaps like the sorts of things that you actually help people with. And my understanding is a lot of the clients that you, you help are. I mean, generally it's around career advice, but also people that are, you know, perhaps looking to do that in Australia and don't necessarily have the. Having grown up in Australia and kind of have a, a different background. Um, so I'd love to understand kind of, what are perhaps some of the, like some of the challenges that, uh, that you commonly see, like what is, what is a classic case, uh, that Juliana is out there to fix? Yeah.

Juliana:

Okay. So I would say in the career side, the, the biggest thing that comes to me, the majority of the time it is. Clients looking for some guidance in terms of understanding about the Australia market, right? The way recruitment works here, the way the market works here is completely different from south America, Asia, America, India. Um, so it's very specific. Um, so the majority of the people come to Australia and go, oh yeah, I'm gonna do this. I'm gonna do that. And then they realize that ops, there is something that I'm missing. How does this works? What do these people are looking for? Um, So I would say understanding about the Australia market. Um, another thing that is also very common, it is when, um, uh, people basically want to know. Literally the aspects of how am I going to get into this market? So now I understood how this works. How am I gonna get into this? Right. And that's when it comes the, the, the job that I do in the career coaching side of things. So, um, I've got programs where we can set up. The professional portfolio, which is CV cover letter, LinkedIn, um, that are programs that have this combination and a mock interview as well. Uh, and other programs that I do a kind of more, uh, detailed report and assessment personality task. Um, and also I got a program there's initial five to 10 weeks where I develop that according to the client needs. So I've got clients in Australia already looking for career transition. Or changing markets or, um, looking to step up in their career. How can we do that? Um, But, but usually it is about understanding what the market is and how am I going to get there? Um, yeah, basically these in the career side, right in the life side, the life coaching side, cuz the areas are super interlink to, so I would say. Confidence, I would say relationship across the board family, um, you know, uh, friendship and working relationships as well is something that comes up very big. Um, especially because here in Australia, we got people from all over the world. Uh, and it's very challenging from someone that comes from a specific culture to fit in the Australian culture, um, which I love because it's very straightforward. People are very black and white. But there are people that don't really understand why, or I went to an interview and the client says this and that, I don't think he lied me. And I was like, no, that's actually standard. Um, you did very well. And then the person calls me back and says, I've got the second interview. Uh, so it takes a little while for them to warm up. Right. Um, and, uh, basically having career and life interlinked, my job is always to have a positive impact on these people's life. Right. Um, having the, the, the, the, the end result, I would say.

James:

Yeah, definitely. You mentioned there, there are some differences in Australia. like compared to sort of the rest of the world. What are some of those differences? Like where, where do we, where does Australia like, perhaps are they good and bad differences in your opinion? I don't know. Um, yeah. What are some differences

Juliana:

I think it is actually fantastic. I really love the, the Australian culture. That's why I love this country so much. Um, hear people, very black and white and very straight to the point. I think if you look across, um, You know, different markets, some professionals, they would think they're being generalistic. It is a very positive thing. Also I can do 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 different things. Look at how awesome I am. Well, great, wonderful. That you can do five different things, but here in Australia, the market is a specialist is not generalist market. So the client will be looking for. Specific, uh, skills. Um, there is specific mindset, perhaps there is specific attitude for you to develop that job and, uh, to add value to the business. Um, so a lot of my clients that come from overseas, um, They, they usually take a little, a little while, but that's obviously the work, which is very rewarding afterwards when they can get the results. Um, but understanding that, uh, they need to focus in one area and their area is usually the area that they like the most. And that's how you become a specialist. And that's how you generate this value, um, to the company, to, to, to whoever you are working with. So I would say being more, uh, a specialist and generalist, um, it is one of the main characteristics.

James:

that's interesting. It's interesting perspective because I guess like many of us and, you know, young people like myself, even like, you know, we haven't really seen many other like sort of job, uh, like marketplaces or whatever that aren't in Australia. So it's interesting to hear that, uh, definitely.

Juliana:

Mm-hmm

James:

Um, so like, what would your advice be? I mean, someone that's coming in from, from overseas here and they have that more of a generalist, like approach to, to jobs where they're, they are across multiple areas. What's the next steps for them there? How can they like, do you, is it more of a framing of their experiences that they are a specialist in, in certain areas? Or is there an element of like upscaling where they do actually need to go and learn. Things so that I can actually become more of a specialist.

Juliana:

Yeah. So, so this is the thing, I think the first thing, um, my advice would be look for someone. That will know how, how this works. Right? Look, look for professional that will help you to, to understand that because, um, there are a lot of different, um, ways of presenting a CV, a cover letter, a LinkedIn, um, depending where you are. Right. So for example, uh, in south America, the cover letter, it is a more general overview about yourself. So you pretty much put everything in there. Right? A lot of details, a lot of different information here in Australia works completely different. When the job ask for cover letter, they are actually asking for you to highlight to the business, what are your abilities matching with the job that you can actually, uh, be able to provide to the company? So they are looking for a reassurance that you would be a potential candidate for them to interview and waste their time. And they're not really interested if you like swimming, or if you like football, they just wanna know. First stage of the process. I wanna know, how can you actually add value to my business? What do you have that will help us to get to where we wanna get and how can we, as a business can help you to, you know, develop your skills further. Um, so, and, and obviously there are a lot of different areas in CV and LinkedIn as well that I can talk a little bit more in detail, but my first advice is if you don't. Where you are in terms of, okay. I understand about the market. I understand this. And if you don't know, look for a professional, do not make a mistake of, I'll see how you go. Uh, I'll give it a go. Uh, because you regret the Austral markets, especially here in Sydney. Um, the markets is more. Right. And, uh, once we start putting a name out there, it is your reputation. You will be known as James, uh, will be known as Juliana. And people will talk about you as you grow and you develop your career. So if you are specialist in the area, if you want understand what these people are looking for, you definitely gonna have a very successful career, but if you be on the, I'll see what happens, I'll CLC. You're actually wasting time. You're actually burning your cards. Right. Cause you're not creating that credibility that you should, um, when you are entering, especially if you're a grad

James:

thanks for listening to this episode of graduate theory. If you haven't already subscribed to the graduate theory newsletter you can do so by at the links in the show notes, the graduate theory newsletter comes out every single Tuesday morning with my thoughts and lessons from each episode. But without further ado, let's get back into it. Yeah, definitely. Oh, that's, that's interesting. And I'd love to ask too. You mentioned there the CV resume, that sort of thing. I'd love to kinda get in, in the weeds here a little bit with, uh, some of this into the details, uh, you know, and, and talk about kind of the, the approaches that, that you bring to these kinds of documents. Cause obviously there, there are quite important. Yeah, cuz without having a good setup here, you won't get to the interview until you're getting sort of knocked out the first, the first round. Um, so I'd love to ask you, you know, what are some big, uh, perhaps you can start wherever here, but like some mistakes that you commonly see, um, with these types of documents, um, that, you know, people that

Juliana:

Hmm.

James:

commonly are like, okay, you just, you don't have this right. Like, go like we need to fix this like straight away. Is there any like common. Like problems there that

Juliana:

Yeah, look very, very good question because, um, the, the structure of the CV is extremely important. Right? Why am I saying this? Um, so here in Australia, as I mentioned to you before I've worked in, in, in different areas of career development, recruitment, and, um, you know, guiding professionals. So. Each company, let's say, if you, if you're talking about recruitment agencies, right. And you're dealing with a recruiter, these people will be using a type of CRM to obviously collect that, that their CV. And, uh, we start developing the database. Let's say this, the, the large organizations, they will have, uh, a recruitment area. Uh, they will have a different type of CRM. The consulting business will have a different type of CRM. So each company will use that CRM, that database for a different purpose. A recruitment agency is much more specialized because that's what they do. They map the entire market and they highlight talents to their clients. Not necessarily a consulting business will do the same, cuz they're dealing with internal clients, not necessarily an internal recruitment business from a large organization will have the same CRM cuz they work internally. So why am I telling all this? Because a lot of people get caught up in the illusion because they do not have much understanding about what the market's looking for and they just create, um, let's say a CVE, a Canva, right? So if you are in a, in a, in. UX design, if you are in a, in a very, uh, alternative area of work. Fair enough. But if you're going to the corporate world and you're putting a lot of tables, photos, uh, uh, different clicks, and once the CV is uploaded into the system, The information gets all confused and all messed up. The majority of the time, these people do not get called for future opportunities, not just the one that they applied for. Cuz the intention when you are applying to a job inside a large organization is for you to be in, in, in their database and be called a little bit in the Fu further down the future. Right? You, you want people to identify skills when they're doing the search, but if you're CV or a lot of tables, photos, it's too fancy. Too, too fancy, too much quantity, not much quality. You actually just create an illusion for yourself and then you're just gonna be, oh, look, I've done this. You be amazing on can and I never get called. And then you come and work with a professional that we'll develop a civic, tailored to your area, tailored to what you are looking to achieve tailored to your personality. What the market's looking is specifically for those skills, cetera, et cetera. the person just get one CV out and they get 10 interviews. Right. Um, so that's how it works. So again, if you do not have the knowledge, do not waste your time just on the illusion. Oh, I'll see what happens because we'll see what happens. We'll pull you behind know ahead, right? Yeah. Uh, it's very interesting when you actually, um, dealing with D when you are dealing with different personalities, cuz people go. Can't believe it's happening, but because there is a technique behind it, right. It's not just, uh, put a photo, a little balloon, a little,

James:

yeah,

Juliana:

Yeah.

James:

no, that's interesting. Yeah. I've, I've seen that too. It's I don't know what the, the word they I've seen used to describe it, but yeah, it's the, this software where like you put your resume into it and then like, things like that, like tables and images or whatever it is, like they just like, can't read those things properly. And so then when. I don't know, I've forgotten the name of this thing. It might be called an ATS or something, uh, where it's like trying

Juliana:

yeah. Mm-hmm

James:

you and trying to sort of take your resume and extract like your skills and stuff. You can't really do that if you are. Um,

Juliana:

exactly right. Exactly.

James:

so that it's interesting.

Juliana:

Exactly. Right. Very important.

James:

Nah. Cool. that's so cool. And what about the cover letter? Is there anything there? That's like a similar, um, and perhaps one question too is like cover letters. Do you see them as being like really common? Have they sort of become less common? Cause I, I feel like now, I don't know. I don't see them. I feel like they're getting less common but I'd love to hear kind of your thoughts and perhaps, uh, yeah. What someone could do to write good. Hmm.

Juliana:

Yeah. So from, from my experience, usually co letter, the jobs they're asking for cover letter are the jobs that they are, uh, uh, very specific, right. Um, if I am not looking for someone in a specific, or if I just want to know who is available in the market, I usually don't ask for cover letter. Because I wanna have the flow of, you know, potential candidates coming to my inbox, but if I am wanting to target their market or that type of individual, that type of, um, skills, um, I will potentially ask for cover letter because there will help my search. So rather than going and analyzing three, four pages of CV, I'm gonna read the cover letter in that cover letter. The candidate must tell me why he's good to do that job. And what are the skills that he has that actually matches with the job Des. so then I will have naturally, uh, an interest in interviewing this guy or an interest in reading that CV. So the co ladder think about that. It is the, the, the main, uh, uh, is, is the book, um, uh, uh, main front page. Right? So when you are in the library or, or in, um, in a book shop, you're gonna go say, oh, maybe this book's good. I don't know. Let me have a quick look. You'll go. Oh, awesome. It's everything I wanna read about. And then what do you do? You buy the book and then you read the cover letter helps, um, um, works pretty similar to that. Right? Cause you're gonna read then you're gonna go. Okay, great. That's a potential candidate. Let me see more. And then you're gonna go into detail on the CV. Um, But obviously that's different for, you know, each company or, you know, recruitment agencies really. They usually do not ask for cover letter because the, the, the candidates are the product, right? So you need to map the market and you become specialists in the market. So, uh, you need to understand who is there. Um, but for large company specific projects, they will be asking for it.

James:

Yeah, that's interesting. That's an interesting, um, yeah. Interesting way to put it. I hadn't thought about it like

Juliana:

Have you had that experience with co letter? Have you had

James:

Uh, I, I think I maybe, yeah, like I haven't applied like most of the recent jobs I applied for was when I was applying for graduate roles, which. two years ago now. Um, and so that was like for the last big batch of applications I did. And I think I maybe wrote a couple of couple letters, but vast majority of, of grad roles, um, were just very general. Sometimes it was only like some, some of those games that you have to play. I had you know, to test some skills I don't know what exactly

Juliana:

yeah, yeah, yeah,

James:

but you know, that was kind of the main thing. So certainly I would say maybe like, yeah, maybe 10% of the jobs. Required a cover letter. So it really wasn't

Juliana:

That's true. That's correct. Yeah. That's it. Because if you're going for, for a grad job, right. Um, or graduate role, they, they wanna see different aspects of your personality. They want to, they wanna see if you have done perhaps a volunteer job, UHS your attitude towards a starting or career. Um, so it's a completely different approach than when you're dealing with, uh, a professional that has been the market for 2, 3, 4 years. Um, Plus, right.

James:

Yeah, definitely. No, no. That's yeah. That's an interesting, yeah, it's an interesting way to look at. I like it. Um,

Juliana:

You're listening to me. Just thinking about your experience. Okay. I've done that. No, I haven't. Cool. Makes sense.

James:

no, definitely. Well, what what's, I'd love to ask too, kind of you, you seeing a lot of these people kind of apply for roles and, and helping them do that. What is one area of the, the process that you think people underappreciate or underestimate? Like just how valuable, like, you know,

Juliana:

Mm-hmm

James:

aspect might be, is there anything that, that comes to. Hmm.

Juliana:

Yeah, very, very good question. I like that. So something that I think people underestimate is networking. Right. People don't really see the value in networking, but the reality is once you are in this market for a little while, you will understand that it's not only about what you know, but who, you know, so if you know the right people, these people will give you a shot. Of the process. These people guide you and mentor you towards your goals. Um, and these people, they are connected with other people that will connect to, to other people. And that's when you start creating their network and then you start kind of, uh, you know, getting into their market. You're looking to, so, um, but also for you to do networking, you need to get out of a comfort zone, right? You need to research for events you need to research for, um, Happy hour before, um, um, the pandemic, there were a lot of happy hour, uh, uh, uh, networking events or Thursday 5:00 PM beers that's that's someplace or da, da, da professionals, or if I don't know it professionals or marketing professionals, right. In, in one, one of these networking events, there you go. You can actually five, 10 people. That will lead you to another 10 20 and, and this story goes on, but people don't necessarily focus on networking. Um, and, and networking is extremely important, right? Because if you don't know the important people in the market, so. How you're gonna go about it. Yeah. We'll develop your skills further. No worries. But it will be a little bit slower, right? If you're not the right people, you get there a little faster, uh, and with a little bit of coaching and mentoring, um, you, you can stand out from the crowd for sure.

James:

Yeah. Oh, that's cool. I, I, I, I totally agree. And I think, yeah, knowing the right people is like, uh, yeah, a bit of a, yeah. I mean, every, everyone knows those kinds of people that kind of get jobs through their network. And it's almost seen as like a, oh, like they're so lucky. Like, you know, they like, just like, you know, they're this person that they know gave them a job or whatever, but, um, you know, I guess you can sort of flip that and think, you know, who. is there anyone that, you know, in my network or who can I meet that I can have that kind of opportunity as well? Mm

Juliana:

Totally. And, uh, I see this, for example, now that I've been with new mind consulting since 2020, um, and, and being working the Australia market for 13 years now, my clients, right? The clients from the corporate world know, uh, uh, the clients that I have in new mind consulting terms of one on one sessions or, or, or workshops and stuff, um, They know the quality of the, the, the work or the way you operate and all that. So if you go onto my LinkedIn profile, you're gonna see all the recommendations I having. There. That's a short list, ready to. Because you've got all people there that are extremely, uh, well qualified, but they've gone through the coaching process of what you're expecting this market, how to position themselves, how to present a CV co later, LinkedIn, how are you going to verbalize your ideas and created that credibility through an interview process? Um, And all this helps. Right? So, uh, majority of my clients, um, the ones that leave recommendation on the profile is very interesting. Cuz they come back and say, oh thank you so much. I left your recommendation. So and so go in touch with me. I'm already in an interview and the client calls me and say, Juliana, By the way I'm, I'm hiring. So and so wonderful. Right? The, the end result of the work that you do, uh, is extremely rewarding. You know, seeing people calling you afterwards and say, look, I've got a job by the way, that communication skills that we were working in, uh, in my life coaching sessions, they are now impacting on my career in my career because I'm dealing with my manager in a certain way that, you know, I had to communicate with my wife, perhaps. Um, so. Everything's interlinked right. Life and career. So, um, but going back to your question, the network, it

James:

Yeah. no, definitely. No, that's, that's super cool. Um, I'd love to kind of, yeah, go into a bit more of a career general career questions, um, for you. And one of those is like out of, you've seen a lot of people kind of go from job seeker to re have a job. and kind of then progress into someone that sort of flourishes in the workplace. I'd love to ask you, you know, what traits do you see in these kinds of people that, um, you know, what traits allow people to succeed? Is there any traits there that you, uh, that are common across people that tend to find it like super easy? They, they got their job super easy and now they're off doing amazing things. Like, are there any traits there that, that are perhaps similar across those kinds of people? Okay.

Juliana:

Okay. Super easy. Unfortunately, doesn't really exist. It doesn't really exist. The, the, the super easy, when you, when you're talking about, uh, I'm, I'm just thinking about my experience when I first arrived in Australia. Right. I always knew about my potential. Uh, and, uh, but I didn't know anything about Australia, especially about the market. Right? So when I started, I was doing what the majority of the people do. Oh, let me see what happens. I believe in my potential. I know I'm gonna get an interview. I know I'm gonna get a job until I got your appointed that I was like, hang on a minute. There is something I'm missing. What is it? And then I start looking for guidance. I worked with professionals in the market that were coaching me throughout the process that do the job that I do nowadays. And that became a little bit easier to create credibility because I knew what people were expecting from me, but not because I I've done something, you know, outside of the world. I believe that, um, When you are looking to enter in the, in the Australia market, if you know how to set up your CV, Cator LinkedIn, and you know how to create credibility through that document. The interview is pretty much the same approach, but the verbalization of what has created that credibility. Um, so once you understand that it is much easier for you to pass to a second stage of the interview and get an. Right. If you don't, you might be answering something that people are not really expecting. And, uh, that's when you fire, but you don't know that because you haven't had a professional guiding throughout that. And then you're gonna be like, oh, maybe my CVS not good. Or maybe this, maybe that. And the reality is all about how are you going to verbalize your ideas and created that credibility. Um, you need to give a reason to your employer, why they're gonna hire you, right. Why, what can you do for my business? How are you going to add value to my company? What skills can you bring to the table? Oh, Juliana. But I'm a grad. I, I haven't worked, I don't have any experience in it in, you know, in, in, in a corporate job or in a pay job. No problem. You can do a volunteer work. You can do a unpaid work. You can show to your potential employer, that you have the attitude to get out of your comfort zone, that you are meeting people in the market that you understand what they are looking for. That you have done your research in the. In the company webpage that you connected with. So and so on LinkedIn from the company. Um, so it is more about, uh, you developing the, the, the, the, the self, you know, knowledge and the life kind of aspect. And then you adding that into your career challenges. Um, It's much as much easier. I wouldn't say easier. I don't like that word, but because nothing's really easy, you need to work for everything you're gonna want to achieve. But once usually you're, uh, uh, solid in that part of life, career flows and vice versa. Um, so my advice would be look for someone that can help you. So you'd be better guided and you were definitely going to achieve your results. Definitely. There is, there is no way you're not going to, if I arrived here with no English, right. And no idea. And I've been building and working hard for all these years. If I go there, anyone can get there. Right. But you need to work hard. You need to work hard. You need to deal with frustrations. You need to deal with, um, you know, a lot of different aspects for you to get to a point that you go, cool. I know what I'm doing. Great. I I'm ready to go for this, you know?

James:

Mm. No, that's super good. I, yeah, I totally agree with like, getting help and things like that. I think finding someone or something to help you, like understand the process and, and work out what it is that you need to do can really, instead of you trying to work it out yourself, like having someone or yeah. Like whatever it is, reading something course mentor like yourself or whatever it is like. Yeah. That can just shortcut a lot of time off the process.

Juliana:

Exactly. Exactly. And that comes all the, the, the, the personal aspects. Right? You need to have a determination, you need to be able to adapt. You need to, uh, uh, uh, pretty much back up what you're saying. right. You're going to the interview. Look, I can do, I can do this, this and that. Get you the job. And people go, oh, but they are, you're not well prepared. And then you create an illusion and, and, uh, you know, if you do not look for development in those areas, you're just gonna become a victim of the system, right. Or, and all my bosses, they are this, all the jobs that I go is like this, all the people that I work for. It's not really about that. It's about you understanding where the gap is working hard to amend that point, improve that point in your life. And you know, the, the purpose of, uh, new mind consulting here is build the best version of yourself because you will build right. It is a process you're building every day is not boom. I've done a course. I'm ready to go. Um, I wish and I'm sure you wish

James:

absolutely amazing. Well, I've got like one more question here for you, Juliana, and that is around, um, you know, a lot of the audience listing is kind of grads or early career people looking to sort of, you know, start their career and, and started off in the right manner. And I'd love to ask thinking about yourself and your journey. If you could kind of wind back the clock to when you first graduated union and. Went out into the world of work, knowing what you know now and, and all the things you teach, what would you go back? And, and is there any advice you'd give yourself? Um, if you were, if you were in that stage now,

Juliana:

Okay. If I'm in that stage now. So going back to my first point, look for someone that will guide you, that will give you a full picture, because it's so much easier when you know where you're going. And I'm saying this because I've gone through that process myself here in Australia, I've tried, um, you know, a couple of times to get into the market. Um, with the, the knowledge that I had back in the days, I was well, 23, 24 years old. Um, and, uh, I wasn't getting anywhere. Once I hired someone and I said, look, this is where I come from. This is the experience I have so far. This is where I wanna go. And this is what I would like to achieve. How can I prepare to actually face the challenge and actually getting there? Okay. So we are gonna have to work on CV cover later. LinkedIn, we're gonna have to work on a mock interview. What's your interview style interview is one of the crucial points here, right? Cause the majority of the people think, oh, do you have a questionnaire that I can have a look? Or do you have a video on YouTube? Look, not really because the worst thing you can do in an interview process is decorating answer and, uh, question and answer, question and answer. Cause when you are in an interview, obviously you will know more or less what they're gonna be asking you. But more than that, you need to build your thought process. You need to learn how to build your tosis because if the, the interviewer ask you something that is outside of your, uh, uh, preparation, let's say you are gonna go blind. You're gonna go. And then you just answer whatever. And after all the excitement, uh, you know, went down, you just go, mm, I shouldn't have answered that. Oh, I didn't prepare for that. Oh, the question that I decorated wasn't asked, so it is not about decorating it's about you learning, how to create credibility through, you know, your thought process. How do you build that thought process? How do you tell your story? Um, so that, that comes on the, the, the mentorship as well. Right? So if you know what you're doing. Good on you. Get yourself ready, go for it all the best luck. If you don't know, or if you in doubt, search for a professional search for someone that will, um, you know, clear the, the, the road for you so you can drive through and, uh, get to your final destination. Sounds easy. Doesn't it? Yeah.

James:

That sounds easy. Perfect. Well, yeah. Thanks so much of your time today, Juliana, and I'd love to ask, you know, people that are listening, where they can go to find out more about yourself and hear about the things you do.

Juliana:

Okay, beautiful. So I've got an Instagram page is at new mind consulting. Uh, and I also have a website and new mind consulting.com and, uh, my LinkedIn page is Julianna OWIN. Uh, you find me there as well. And, uh, yeah, anyone looking for help to build the best version of themselves just get in touch would be a pleasure to.

James:

Fantastic. We we'll have links to all that stuff in the show notes. Um, but yeah, thanks so much for coming on the show

Juliana:

Nice one. Thank you so much for your time as well. Pleasure.

James:

Thanks for listening to this episode I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did. If you want to get my takeaways, the things that I learned from this episode, please go to graduate theory.com/subscribe, where you can get my takeaways and all the information about each episode, straight to your inbox. Thanks so much for listening again today, and we're looking forward to seeing you next week.